How to choose a massage table
Masseurs work with different clients: some are small, others are very tall, some have very broad shoulders, others have hips and so on. That is why a good adjustable massage…

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Classic is always in fashion
Basic techniques and techniques help you achieve the best results. First-class massage therapists - what is their secret? If you observe how the most eminent massage therapists work, the largest…

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MASSAGE WITH OAK BIRDS
Many people really do not know why bath brooms are needed. Many sauna lovers are surely convinced that the brooms are designed to overwhelm each other to exhaustion - and…

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Movement and the healing process

What do you think: when working with various musculoskeletal injuries, the client should remain motionless or vice versa – will the movement help speed up the recovery process?

I believe that the second option is absolutely true and that’s why: when the body is stationary, muscle adhesions (adhesions) and scar tissue form much faster, which slows down the healing process. Scar tissue can form both within the damaged tissue and go beyond them. In the first case, scar tissue replaces the tissues of the tendon, ligament or muscle itself. In the second case, scar tissue is formed between damaged and gradually restored tissues and healthy tissues of adjacent fascia, bones, muscles, ligaments, and so on.

If after receiving an injury a person will be in a stationary position for a long time, scar tissue will form in both ways, which will interfere with treatment and slow down natural recovery. Moreover, the restoration will proceed faster and, most importantly, more fully, if you develop damaged structures using the full range of mobility. Again, the whole point is that it helps to minimize the formation of adhesion and scar tissue.

If movements (passive or, less likely immediately after the injury, active) are performed in an incomplete range, scar tissue will still form in the most inappropriate places, because of which the consequences of a regular injury will haunt a person for many years to come.

Scar tissue, which forms in the damaged structures themselves or forms adhesions with surrounding tissues, leads to chronic impaired mobility and pain. People with such a problem have to constantly monitor themselves and avoid various physical activities and even ordinary activities. After all, they understand that they should look up, bend to the floor to raise a pencil or fall on a knee that was injured once long ago, and they will have to endure severe pain for several weeks.

When we, massage therapists and manual therapists, when working with a client, make passive movements in various joints of his body, using the full range of movement (you can even say the maximum available), damaged tissues, of course, are replaced by scar tissue, but it is much smaller than with the absence of movements and it will be located specifically in the area of ​​injury. Adhesions do not form between the fibers of the damaged and healthy tissues, therefore, the nearby muscles and other structures retain their strength and mobility.

For example, if after a serious ankle sprain, the leg (foot and ankle joint) remains motionless for a long time, it is likely that scar tissue will form not only in the damaged ligaments, but also between these inflamed ligaments (or one ligament) and surrounding structures, such as bones or fascia.

To avoid this, the client should start developing the ankle as early as possible (monitoring his condition). First, movements should be made in the accessible range and not load damaged structures with body weight, then proceed to the development of the ankle already with weight and so on until discomfort is minimized – in this case, the likelihood of adhesions and excess scar tissue is minimized.

What do you think: when working with various musculoskeletal injuries, the client should remain motionless or vice versa – will the movement help speed up the recovery process?

I believe that the second option is absolutely true and that’s why: when the body is stationary, muscle adhesions (adhesions) and scar tissue form much faster, which slows down the healing process. Scar tissue can form both within the damaged tissue and go beyond them. In the first case, scar tissue replaces the tissues of the tendon, ligament or muscle itself. In the second case, scar tissue is formed between damaged and gradually restored tissues and healthy tissues of adjacent fascia, bones, muscles, ligaments, and so on.

Ayurvedic oil massage
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