Seven principles of tissue density recovery
Restoring tissue density is a massage technique based on the theory of Linda LePelli, which states that pain in the structures of the musculoskeletal system is directly related to an…

Continue reading →

Rectus femoris muscle
The rectus femoris muscle divides the front of the thigh in two and is located between the tailor muscle and the tensor of the broad fascia of the thigh. The…

Continue reading →

MASSAGE WITH OAK BIRDS
Many people really do not know why bath brooms are needed. Many sauna lovers are surely convinced that the brooms are designed to overwhelm each other to exhaustion - and…

Continue reading →

Indian methods

1 2 3 6

Seven principles of tissue density recovery

Restoring tissue density is a massage technique based on the theory of Linda LePelli, which states that pain in the structures of the musculoskeletal system is directly related to an increase in tissue density. By restoring normal tissue density, you will thereby relieve your client of pain. In addition, by carefully assessing and comparing the density of different tissues of the client, it is possible to accurately diagnose various problems with the musculoskeletal system before, during and after therapy.

To get started, let us turn our attention to the tissue density rating scale developed by Linda.

Level 0 = sluggish fabric, “hanging”, does not resist the force of gravity. This tissue density indicates that a Continue reading

Headache and injuries of the ligaments of the cervical vertebrae

Question: True or not: headaches can occur due to damage to the ligaments of the vertebrae C5, C6 and C7.

Answer: A reflected headache usually occurs only when the ligaments of the upper cervical vertebrae are damaged.

Headache is often reflected pain (radiating) and occurs due to damage to the ligaments of the vertebrae C2 and C3 (supraspinatus and transversal ligaments). Of course, there can be many causes of headaches Continue reading

How many eyes does a massage therapist have?

From the moment the client entered our office, and until his departure, we must carefully monitor him. Full immersion in the process of examining the client and a thorough analysis of all the “prompts” available to your senses, left by the client’s body and body, can provide boundless amounts of information that will help you choose the most effective technique for this particular case and develop a treatment strategy. The result will be healthy and satisfied customers!

Of course, we are all used to relying on our eyesight – with our own eyes we can see the client’s gait, his posture, movements, mental and emotional state. But this is only the beginning. Each massage therapist Continue reading

1 2 3 6
Ayurvedic massage
Let's go back to antiquity when there were no antibiotics, but there were special treatment techniques, instead of pills and injections, the sensitive fingers of a masseur. The word "massage"…

...

Massage history
Even in ancient times, massage was known as a remedy. Massage was used by primitive people. Obviously, stroking, rubbing, kneading the sore spot at first was purely instinctive. It was…

...

Seven principles of tissue density recovery
Restoring tissue density is a massage technique based on the theory of Linda LePelli, which states that pain in the structures of the musculoskeletal system is directly related to an…

...

What is really important?
Reflections on what a massage therapist needs to develop The massage therapist career requires a flexible mind, a hardy body and, most importantly, their strong connection. We have a great…

...